Award-winning fossil-free jacket

Award-winning, Bio-based Jacket

In February, the Swedish company Tierra won the sustainability award ISPO Award Eco Achievement Apparel for its Deterra jacket, which is manufactured from 100 percent bio-based materials. Deterra is a padded jacket where the outer fabric resembles nylon in the structure, but is made of oil from ricin beans. The lining is made of wool from German sheep and the Tencel threads are extracted from wood. The jacket’s buttons are made of corozo nuts from the tagua palm. By reducing the number of components in the jacket, transportation has also decreased during production.

“Deterra shows how technical you can make a jacket today while also being completely fossil free. We can of course make lightweight, waterproof and cheaper jackets, but then they are not 100 percent bio-based,” says Erik Isaksson, who is responsible for product development at Tierra.

Gabriel Arthur
gabriel.arthur@norragency.com


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