Saving the ice

Saving the Ice

That glaciers all around the globe are melting is a well-known fact. This implies that the natural records of variations in atmospheric composition – a vital contribution to environmental and climate science – is also disappearing. To preserve this scientific heritage for generations to come, UNESCO launched the Ice Memory project in March. The goal is to constitute the world’s first library of archived glacier ice, deep down in the Antarctic ice cover. The project is managed by the University of Grenoble Alpes in collaboration with other universities and experts from the international community of glaciologists. Outdoor companies like the Italian shoemaker AKU also sponsor the Ice Memory project.

unesco.org

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Gabriel Arthur
gabriel.arthur@norragency.com


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