Coffee. Sack. Kayak?

You read right: Using a 3D printer and used coffee sacks, Melker of Sweden prints kayaks – showing the hard goods’ circular revolution may finally be at hand.

The Circular Economy, like Fusion Energy, always seems to be about 30 years away. We’re told that it’s a quaint vision to strive for, but one that currently has too many barriers to achieve widespread implementation.

That’s why it comes as such shock to see this:

No, this is not a CGI image in a part of an investment pitch. This is the production facility to Melker of Sweden and it’s already begun churning out products.

© Kiwi Street Studios

Using locally sourced, biobased coffee sacks from its neighboring coffee roaster Löfbergs, Melker recycles what would otherwise be waste material into stock for its 3D printer for large scale production of kayaks, longboards and SUPs.

“It’s a method where we recycle material to create customized products in a completely circular ecosystem. Naturally, without compromising our product quality or design,” says Melker CEO and creative director Pelle Stafshede in a press release.

Not only are the products fully customizable based on individual needs, their material, design and construction also make it possible to recycle and return the material into the supply chain at end of life, whereupon it can be used to create new products.

Change the Game

Melker of Sweden was founded in 2015 with one goal: to completely change the game of the outdoor hardware industry.

Game on, hardware. Who’s in?

 

Photos: Melker of Sweden, © Roger Borgelid

Jonathan Eidse
jonathan.eidse@norragency.com


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