The discussion surrounding the comparative environmental impacts of organic cotton over non-organic continues to fire up from time to time in industry circles. But what’s the situation on the ground?

To shine a light on positive local aspects of organic cotton production, Textile Exchange has collected stories from growers all around the globe, and presents them on the website aboutorganiccotton.org.

For Managing Director of Textile Exchange, La Rhea Pepper, the advantages of organic cotton are unequivocal, both in terms of social and environmental sustainability:

“Organic cotton production systems produce longterm sustainability for the health of people and the planet by proactively and positively addressing key impact areas,” explains La Rhea Pepper.

These key areas include such things as building biodiversity, increasing food security, sequestering carbon through crop rotation and soil building practices. Moreover, organic cotton production also reduces overall exposure to toxic chemicals from synthetic pesticides that end up in the ground, air, water and food supply, and that are associated with numerous health consequences, from asthma to cancer.

“Organic cotton provides a pathway to restorative, resilient and regenerative rural landscapes and communities, not just for current generations but also for generations to come.”

 

Photo: Edward Jonkler/Alamy

Jonathan Eidse
jonathan.eidse@norragency.com
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