Patagonia’s 2025 Climate Goal

Patagonia recently announced its updated climate goals – aiming to eliminate or mitigate all its carbon emissions in just 5 years. Here’s how.

Beating the Paris Agreement’s timeline by 25 years, Patagonia’s climate goal is ambitious to say the least – especially considering the size of the company and scale of its operations.  To achieve this goal, it will embark on a four-part process that is aimed to stabilize the company’s carbon footprint at zero, while the business continues to grow.

The first part involves acquiring robust data using a third-party validated system to measure the company’s impacts from raw resource extraction to material creation to delivery of products to customers. With reliable data in hand, the second part involves reducing their impact. With the majority of emissions coming from producing the product’s materials, Patagonia plans increased use of recycled materials, extending product lifespans and a program that aims to calculate and reduce greenhouse gas emissions along Patagonia’s supply chain.

The third part involves a conversion to renewable energy. Already by the outset of 2020, Patagonia aims to have its global owned and operated locations 100 percent renewably powered. Within its supply chain, Patagonia is also supporting its suppliers to invest in renewable energy projects at their facilities.

The fourth and final part aims to capture the remaining carbon emissions via Regenerative Organic Agriculture and reforestation projects.

 

PHOTO: ISTOCK

SUSTON
jonathan.eidse@norragency.com


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