“Better than new” – brand expands its repair service

Swiss outdoor outfitter Mammut announces its reinvigorated repair services that will integrate repairability into its design process, add new service partners and proactively communicate to customers to choose repair over new purchases.

The people at Mammut understand that the most sustainable purchase is no purchase at all. But thanks to the layering principle, Mammut designs outdoor equipment that lasts through the seasons and accompanies explorers on their adventures not just this year and the next, but for many years to come.

Long-term use is the simplest way to reduce the ecological footprint of outdoor equipment because a longer service life reduces the annual environmental impact. Mammut has always stood for durable high-quality products. Nevertheless, defects can never be completely ruled out, whether due to heavy use, a latent material defect or a malheur. However, this is by no means a reason to immediately dispose of the product: Mammut’s Repair & Care service can help.

Repair firmly anchored in design

In its in-house repair studios in Seon, Switzerland, and with the help of a well-established network of local studios and third-party suppliers, Mammut has repaired around 16,000 products a year to date—and the number is set to rise steadily. Repairs are an important part of Mammut’s sustainability strategy, as they reduce the use of resources and promote conscious consumption. But just as importantly, they help identify weaknesses and to continuously improve products. This approach is also reflected in Mammut’s design philosophy:

“At the core of our design philosophy lies the belief in creating innovative gear that performs at its best in the outdoors with the least possible impact on the environment and is optimized for the circular economy,” explains Paul Cosgrove, Chief Product Officer at Mammut.

No new trend

Repairing products is back—and not just in the outdoor industry. What was part of everyday life until the middle of the last century is now making its way back into our closets. And that’s important. Adrian Huber, Head of Corporate Responsibility, explains why:

“For the circular economy to become suitable for the masses, we as a company need to raise awareness, normalize and mobilize. Not only our customers, but all stakeholders. Only through widespread adoption of circular practices, such as repairs, can we truly realize the positive impact we promote.”

To be able to carry out an even larger volume of repairs in the future, Mammut will professionalize its processes and continuously expand its repair services with the help of partners in the coming years.

More information on Mammut’s sustainability principles and practices can be found in the Responsibility Report 2022 (published at the end of June 2023 and available in English only) and on the website mammut.com/responsibility.

 

About Mammut

Founded in 1862, Mammut is a Swiss outdoor company that provides high-quality products and unique brand experiences for fans of mountain sports around the world. This leading international premium brand has stood for safety and pioneering innovation for 160 years. Mammut products combine functionality and performance with contemporary design. With its combination of hardware, shoes and clothing, Mammut is one of the most complete suppliers in the outdoor market. Mammut Sports Group AG operates in around 40 countries and employs around 800 people.

mammut.com

 

Photo: Mammut / Maximilian Gierl

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jonathan.eidse@norragency.com


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