Vote! Which Conservation Project to Fund?

Vote! Which Conservation Project to Fund?

Twice a year, the European Outdoor Conservation Association (EOCA) receives applications from conservation organisations with projects that require funding. EOCA now asks for YOUR help in choosing three projects to receive funding!!

 

Following a rigorous selection procedure, EOCA creates a shortlist of these projects to consider for funding. The shortlisted projects are put into 3 categories: Forests, Water and Wild Places.

 

For this voting round, EOCA has partnered with Suston to present the “Forest” category finalists. Get involved by choosing your favourite project in each category – the project which receives the most votes in each category will receive the funding they have requested from EOCA!

Bringing Back the Birds, Nigeria

Bringing Back the Birds, Nigeria

About the Area: Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve, an important bird area, sits on the Nigerian/Cameroon border among the rolling hills and grassland of the Mambilla Plateau. It is one of only a few remaining stands of montane forest, and harbours rich and unique biodiversity including species new to science and endangered Nigerian/Cameroon chimpanzees. There are 2 main forest stands within this 46km square reserve – 250 and 520 ha in size.  However, they are being burnt, grazed and degraded at a rapid rate by local cattle herders seeking grass cover and water.

 

Project Objectives: This project aims to restore stream side forest by germinating and planting 8000 seedlings, increasing habitat for bird forest specialists and benefiting the whole reserve by connecting forest habitats to encourage the movement of all wildlife.  The project will work with the cattle herders to ensure their needs are met, whilst ensuring the success of the planting and take actions to preventing fires in the area.

 

Fighting for Rare Atlantic Rainforest, UK

Fighting for Rare Atlantic Rainforest, UK

About the Area: The Rusland Valley area contains ancient semi-natural woodland defined as Atlantic Rainforest. It is the most densely wooded valley in the Lake District National Park, supporting some of the richest and most treasured habitats in the British Isles. The main threats to the woodland are invasive species and climate change.

 

Project Objectives: Through this project, The Rusland Horizons Trust plans substantial habitat improvement work over 50 hectares, in conjunction with supportive landowners. This will be delivered through the removal of non-native species; native seed propagation, planting and seedling protection; lichen and moss translocation from diseased trees; creation of protected areas to stop deer browsing; provision of nest boxes for key native species when natural nesting sites are absent, and coppicing where appropriate to support biodiversity and natural regeneration. The project will include community engagement events such as talks and educational walks.

 

Restoring Hardknott Forest, UK

Restoring Hardknott Forest, UK

About the Area: This project is an exciting opportunity to restore one of the largest conifer plantations in the Lake District National Park into a native woodland. Without intervention, these conifers will spread and dominate, preventing native woodlands from developing.

 

Project Objectives: This project, run by University of Leeds, will engage volunteers to remove non-native species, plant native trees and monitor the recovery of the woodland and its associated wildlife. The new woodlands will improve habitats for nature, increase biodiversity and carbon capture, and enhance the experience for outdoor enthusiasts. The project will host 6 visits from local schools, providing opportunities for children to get involved. EOCA’s funding will plant 1,500 trees, remove conifers from 90 hectares, and enable natural regeneration of 150,000 native trees. Monitoring and research will provide detailed data documenting how new native woodlands in the UK capture carbon dioxide.

 

Saving La Primavera's last wildlife corridor for pumas, Mexico

Saving La Primavera's last wildlife corridor for pumas, Mexico

About the Area: This project will conserve the last wildlife corridor for larger mammals around the Biosphere Reserve “Bosque La Primavera” (BLP) in Jalisco, Mexico, which covers 30,500 ha of oak-pine and tropical deciduous forest. The area hosts many species, including pumas, however, cannot provide a viable habitat area for them if connections to other forests are not conserved. Moreover, nearby Guadalajara means forest fires and land-use change drive biodiversity loss.

 

Project Objectives: The Centre for Research and Projects in Environment and Development (CIPAD) has partnered with local organisations and communities to conserve the last active wildlife corridor towards the Ahuisculco mountains since 2010, and now needs to restore 10 ha of critical habitat using 10,000 native tree species. This will link the mountains to the reserve, enabling wildlife to travel between both. The project will monitor biodiversity in the area with camera traps, and run a communication and awareness campaign. (Photo: Antonio Márquez and Francisco Quintero)

 

 

Jalthal Forest Conservation Project, Nepal

Jalthal Forest Conservation Project, Nepal

About the Area: Jalthal, the only remnant patch of unique tropical moist forest from eastern Nepal, is richly biodiverse forest comprising of a wide range of habitat including lakes, rivers, forests and grasslands. It provides habitats to several threatened species like Asiatic Elephant and Indian Pangolin. The forest became degraded due to selective logging, over-grazing and fire in past, and is now being heavily infested with invasive ‘mile a minute’ weed Mikania micrantha, killing and replacing native grasses and tree species.

 

Project Objectives: Green Governance Nepal will work with community groups managing the forest to clear 80ha of prime elephant habitat infested with Mikania, carry out enrichment plantation of 20,000 native tree seedlings, and assist communities to produce bio-briquettes from Mikania vines to create a mechanism for continuous removal of invasive weeds. It will also rehabilitate two degraded wetlands areas, protect eroding river banks, conduct community workshops on biodiversity conservation, run a school education programme and trail clean-up programme with students as well as establish a ‘Visitor Centre’ and other tourism focused infrastructures.

 

 

Racing for Conservation, Kenya

Racing for Conservation, Kenya

About the Area: The project objective is to raise awareness of the beauty and value of Arabuko-Sokoke Forest – the largest remaining fragment of coastal forest that once spanned East Africa. Arabuko-Sokoke is home to 28 Red Listed species including the Sokoke Scops Owl and a population of 200+ elephants. However, illegal logging for house construction, charcoal production and hunting are all threatening this unique ecosystem.

 

Project Objectives: A Rocha works with forest adjacent communities by providing eco-bursaries to secondary school students with funds raised from eco-tourism that are closely linked to conservation action for the forest. This project will improve biking trails through the forest to enhance the Sokoke Forest MTB Challenge. All race proceeds go to eco-bursaries for the community. Furthermore, 20 young community members will be trained as guides and visitor information updated to raise awareness with tourists and improve their forest experience. Six de-snaring events will be held with community members and 16,000 trees planted in degraded parts of the forest and on adjacent farms and school grounds.

  

Let’s spread the green news

With Suston - Sustainable Outdoor News - you can keep up with the positive steps towards a more sustainable outdoor community.

Sign up for our newsletter